Probably, we have forgotten how to fully rest and relax. The state of constant tension and stress has become the hallmark of the modern person.

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

Life makes more and more demands on us: to be successful in professional and personal life, beautiful, athletic, to have an interesting hobby ... This trend is reinforced by social networks, where they mainly publish stories of personal and professional achievements, which for many people creates the effect of frustration: "How can I manage to do all this?" More and more often, at my consultations, I meet people who either too actively engage in this race for success, exhausting themselves with excessive “achievement”, or vice versa, out of despair go to the other extreme: apathy and rejection of all achievements. Therefore, it is so important to learn how to consciously relax and provide yourself with a good rest, which you need to plan in advance in your schedule as carefully as work. This approach provides the necessary inner resource and harmony to balance between the state of activity and passivity.

One of the most effective and readily available for widespread use of relaxation techniques is Concentrated Relaxation.

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

The Konzentrative Entspannung (KOE) method by Anita Wilda-Kiesel and Brigitte Böttcher was developed in the psychotherapeutic clinic of the University of Leipzig in 1965 and was originally aimed at improving athletes in their GDR professional achievements. As a result, the method turned out to be so effective that the authorities of the GDR even classified it so that "competitors" could not use such useful and simple techniques to restore body resources. And yet, later, Concentrative Relaxation began to be used in Germany also in psychosomatic clinics, for working with a variety of somatic diseases and even when working with pregnant women in preparation for childbirth.

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

Anita Wilda-Kiesel created KOE using two approaches: Functional Relaxation by Marianne Fuchs and Body Psychotherapy by Elsa Gindler. Along with Autogenic training according to I.G. Schultz and Progressive neuromuscular relaxation according to E. Jacobson. Concentrated relaxation refers to techniques that teach patients how to self-relax.

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In the meantime, there is no need to worry about it. ”

In which a person's attention is directed not to muscle relaxation, but to a differentiated perception of his body, to a more conscious control of the body. With Concentrative Relaxation, you do not need to make a lot of effort to relax - it is rather interest, easy holding of attention, "inner mindfulness", turning passive attention to the object - your body, as in meditation. First, there is an awareness of the perception of the contact of the body with the support, when the patient, lying down, describes to the psychotherapist his sensations of contact with the surface “here and now”. Further, the patient perceives areas in his body where there is tension - there is an awareness of the perception of areas of internal tension. Then he learns to "remove", "dissolve" everything connected with tension. At the same time, the body should be relaxed, and attention should be concentrated.

Unlike other relaxation methods, contact with the therapist is very important here: the patient must say out loud how he feels contact with the surface. The task of the therapist in this case: empathically, benevolently confirming that he hears the patient, and reflecting what he says. The therapist asks, for example, what is the area of ​​contact with the support of the head, back, buttocks ... and the patient must consciously choose what he feels (large or small, how many centimeters the area of ​​contact occupies, what is the form of contact). At this moment, the patient concentrates more intensively on the contact area of ​​his body with the support. He is aware of his body and at the same time interacts with the therapist, which is especially important for people who have experienced trauma, because this allows the patient to keep the patient's attention on the sensations in the body, and not "go" into traumatic experiences. The most important thing here is the technique of parallelization: the patient, lying on a support and feeling each of his points of contact with the surface, constantly maintains contact “here and now”. When a person learns to be aware of his body, plunging into deep relaxation, but at the same time maintaining contact with the outside world, it is then that important healing processes are launched in his body.

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